Posted in biology, design and architecture, medical imaging

Making Art From the DNA You Leave Behind

Sort of creepy but interesting exploration of the overlap of science, art, and private vs. public:

Making Art From the DNA You Leave Behind

Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg’s “Stranger Visions” project started with a question: What could she learn about a person by collecting one of their stray hairs? In an age of ever-cheaper DNA sequencing, the answer turned out to be “a lot.” Dewey-Hagborg’s portraits of strangers, made with DNA samples found in public places, called attention to the feasibility of DNA snooping. Now with her latest project, “Invisible,” she wants to put the tools to protect genetic privacy in consumers’ hands. But is total genetic privacy really possible?

via Making Art From the DNA You Leave Behind.

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Posted in biology, chemistry, electronic imaging and displays

This Device Sniffs Out Pollution And Turns It Into Digital Art | The Creators Project

A good way of explaining pollution to people is to visualize it:

:vtol:, aka Dmitry Morozov, has previously turned tattoos into experimental instruments and highlighted the beauty of barcodes. Now, with Digioxide, the Russian artist is turning pollution recognition into tangible artwork. The portable device is equipped with sensors that measure air pollution gases and dust particles. It’s connected to a computer via bluetooth and turns information about the concentration of dust and harmful gases such as CO, CO2, HCHO, CH4 and C3H8 into generative graphics, forming an abstract image.

Digioxide has a mobile printer that allows the pollution data to be turned into physical prints of the digitized images—pixilated, colored graphics that offer a “snapshot” of the surrounding air. :vtol: explains that the tool allows users to “freely move around a city, seek out ecologically problematic places, and turn their data into digital artworks.”

more via This Device Sniffs Out Pollution And Turns It Into Digital Art | The Creators Project.

Posted in biology, chemistry, communication and networking, design and architecture, engineering, Illumination, physics

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

Some are gross, some are cool, some are geeky gifts for school!

Sorry, it’s Friday, I’m feeling a little Dr. Seussy. But I thought they were worth sharing.

These crafty creations would make the perfect gift for the science lover in your life…

[editor’s note/admission: these are also available for sale for the crafty science lover with no time on your hands, but I make no money from this, it’s just FYI.]

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

more via 10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com.

Posted in electronic imaging and displays

This Chameleon-Like Pen Can Match And Recreate Any Color You See In The World | The Creators Project

Technology once again helps out artists with an obsessive need to get that color juuuuust right.

Say there’s this particularly vibrant eggplant you see at the local market, and you want to use that exact lush purple tone to paint your walls with. Or imagine that you’re styling a photoshoot and you need to perfectly match a model’s nails with an electric-yellow convertible in the backgrouind. Trying to mimic colors by eye can only be so fool-proof and unfortunately we don’t have a built-in “Match” filter a la PhotoShop. Thankfully, a new pen is available for pre-ordering that acts as a real-life color copycat, allowing users to match any color they see in the world. The “Scribble” pen is a writing tool with a 16-bit RGB color sensor inside that can draw in over 16 million colors and “save” 100,000 unique colors in its body. The device even has a USB port, an opportunity for owners to upload IRL colors into URL programs and software. Graphic Designers can finally get that perfect shade of red to draw that Fuji apple on Illustrator.The chameleon-like pen is currently available to pre-order at a whopping $150, and is expected to hit the market next year. With a illustration tool like Scribbble, the 64-pack Crayola boxes just won’t cut it anymore.

See some photos of the device via This Chameleon-Like Pen Can Match And Recreate Any Color You See In The World | The Creators Project.

Posted in communication and networking, music, Optics

The gloves that will “change the way we make music” « adafruit

Imogen Heap is working on creating gloves that allow her to direct music adjustments electronically without breaking up the flow of her performance.

…musician Imogen Heap demonstrates the electronic gloves that allow people to interact with their computer remotely via hand gestures.

The interview was filmed at Heap’s home studio outside London, shortly before she launched her Kickstarter campaign to produce a limited production run of the open-source Mi.Mu gloves.

“These beautiful gloves help me gesturally interact with my computer,” says Heap, explaining how the wearable technology allows her to perform without having to interact with keyboards or control panels.

Pushing buttons and twiddling dials “is not very exciting for me or the audience,” she says. “[Now] I can make music on the move, in the flow and more humanly, [and] more naturally engage with my computer software and technology.”

via The gloves that will “change the way we make music” « adafruit industries blog.

I completely agree with Imogen Heap’s sense that it is boring to watch a musician fiddle with dials and knobs during a live show.

Just as a side geek note, I do feel a little bad that when I opened the link (it was sent to me by a coworker) my first thought was “why does she look like Rogue?”

Posted in communication and networking, design and architecture, engineering, music

‘Tainted Love’ Played By Floppy Disk Drives Is Possibly The Best Use Of Technology Ever

The idea of electronic music taken to a whole new level:

This, ladies and gentlemen, is a choir of floppy disk drives covering Soft Cell’s 1981 cover of the 1964 Gloria Jones song, ‘Tainted Love’.

And it is glorious.

It was created by YouTube user Gigawipf who is also responsible for the doing of version of the ‘Inspector Gadget’ theme tune amongst others…

more via ‘Tainted Love’ Played By Floppy Disk Drives Is Possibly The Best Use Of Technology Ever.

Posted in communication and networking, design and architecture, electronic imaging and displays, literature, music, physics, Solar and Alternative Energy

The Record-Breaking XOXO Festival Returns to Cross-Pollinate Art and Tech | Underwire | Wired.com

How did I not know about this event?! And right in my backyard!

Last year, the XOXO festival and conference made waves in the arts and tech world, becoming the highest-funded convention ever on Kickstarter after raising $175,000 and bringing together 400 artists, technologists, and makers in Portland for a four-day celebration of “disruptive creativity.”

The conference returns to Portland this weekend for its sophomore iteration, which will likely determine whether the success of the festival — the brainchild of Andy Baio and Belfast Build conference founder Andy McMillan — is a one-time fluke or a sustainable phenomenon. WIRED sat down with XOXO co-organizer Baio to talk about where XOXO is headed, and what it means for independent creative culture and commerce in the digital age.

The goal of XOXO, says Baio, is to bring together independent artists and the developers building the platforms and systems that can enable them to operate outside of traditional production and distribution models. “First and foremost, XOXO is about independence. It’s about artists and hackers and makers that are using the internet to make a living doing what they love independently without sacrificing creative or financial control.”

XOXO focuses on the intersection of art and tech, and its speakers straddle both worlds: developers and coders who use tech tools to build communities and arts platforms; artists and musicians who self-publish online. Long-term, says Baio, he hopes to see the fest foster cross-field collaborations, and change the shapes those collaborations can take. “You are starting to see a really interesting trend, which is not just coders that are working on stuff for artists, but artists that are then entering into startups.”

more via The Record-Breaking XOXO Festival Returns to Cross-Pollinate Art and Tech | Underwire | Wired.com.

I want details! I have several articles linked below, but I want to hear about it from you! I want write-ups! Reports! Pictures! Did you go? Leave your feedback about your experience in the comments below, please!