Posted in biology, chemistry

The Microbes on the Handprint of an 8-Year-Old After Playing Outside | Colossal

This is really quite a stunningly beautiful study of the human hand in a unique and mirrored way.

We all know our bodies are home to countless millions of bacteria and microorganisms, but without seeing them with our bare eyes it’s almost impossible to comprehend. This petri dish handprint created by Tasha Sturm of Cabrillo College, vividly illustrates the variety of bacteria found on her 8-year-old son’s hand after playing outdoors. The print itself represents several days of growth as different yeasts, fungi, and bacteria are allowed to incubate.

It’s safe to say almost everything you see growing in this specimen is harmless and in many cases even beneficial to a person’s immunity, but it just goes to show why we sometimes it’s good to wash our hands. Sturm discusses in detail how she made the print in the comments of this page.

via The Microbes on the Handprint of an 8-Year-Old After Playing Outside | Colossal.

Posted in electronic imaging and displays, medical imaging

Surreal X-Ray Photographs Reveal Hidden Beauty in Nature | Inhabitat

Beautiful and insightful x-ray pictures of nature.

Our human eyes may be limited by visible light, but the work of physicist and artist Arie van ‘t Riet gives us a glimpse into the invisible universe around us. In exploration of nature’s hidden anatomy, Riet uses x-ray imagery on naturalistic compositions, or bioramas, created from flora and fauna. The challenging photography process requires Riet to experiment with different levels of x-ray energies to achieve the right amount of contrast in each image.

Riet uses x-ray imagery on naturalistic compositions, or bioramas, created from a combination of flora and fauna.
The production process begins with a black-and-white silver bromide x-ray image, which he then digitizes and inverts on his computer.
Riet experimented with similarly thin materials starting with a bouquet of tulips.
Posted in aerospace, astronomy, chemistry, physics

A NASA Engineer Turned Artist Whose Canvas Is a Huge Fish Tank | Design | WIRED

Have you ever been mesmerized by the swirling of the milk in your coffee (or is that just me pre-caffeinated)? Well, that phenomenon at least is interesting to one other person, Kim Keever.

Artist Kim Keever is like a hydroponic Jackson Pollock. Instead of a canvas, though, he drizzles paint into a 200-gallon fishtank.Keever is reticent to share the secrets of his process, but says that after the Sears Easy Living paints are added to the tank, he has anywhere from five to 20 minutes before the liquids diffuse, leaving 200-gallons of murky brown water in their wake. In the moments where the colors whirl and eddy, Keever shoots thousands of photos, choosing one or two before embarking on the five hour processes of emptying, cleaning, and refilling the tank so he can start anew. “They only need to hold up for that ephemeral moment, and then it doesn’t matter,” he says. “Whatever impermanence exists in the materials is irrelevant once the photo is captured.”Keever’s dabblings in acquatic abstract expressionism are a far cry from his rigid college days, where he studied engineering. During summers, he’d intern at NASA, where he worked on missile skin technology and jet nozzles. He had the grades and work ethic to thrive at the space agency and envisioned a career dedicated to improving booster engines, followed by a creative retirement filled with art making. Ultimately, he traded in his slide rule for a low-rent loft in the East Village of New York City.Keever began his art career in the New York City of the 1970s, surrounded by the weirdo glamor of Warhol’s Studio, the emerging art of subway graffiti, and the novel sounds of Grandmaster Flash and disco. He spent nearly two decades as a traditional painter and printmaker until he discovered the style and subject that would become his trademark in 1991.

more via A NASA Engineer Turned Artist Whose Canvas Is a Huge Fish Tank | Design | WIRED.

Posted in chemistry, communication and networking

Factory Food From Above: Satellite Images of Industrial Farms – Wired Science

Sometimes, even in the most horrendous conditions, we can find beauty. For example, Wired recently published an article showcasing aerial photographs of industrial feedyards for animals.

These photos are indeed shocking, but, as even the author of the article admits, “Seen from a satellite, an industrial feedlot has a sort of abstract beauty. The washes of colors, the juxtaposition of organic and rigid geometries, initially obscure the subject.” Others are referring to it as “activist art” and it does indeed invoke a response from the viewer.

Factory Food From Above: Satellite Images of Industrial Farms - Wired Science

Factory Food From Above: Satellite Images of Industrial Farms - Wired Science

more via Factory Food From Above: Satellite Images of Industrial Farms – Wired Science.

 

Posted in biology, chemistry, medical imaging

Photos of the Amazing and Gruesome World Under a Microscope

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be small? Really, really small?

needle and thread

Moth wing

io9 has gathered a spectacular collection of microscopic images from all over the Internet. Check out more via Photos of the Amazing and Gruesome World Under a Microscope.

Posted in chemistry, electronic imaging and displays, food

The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art : The Salt : NPR

Who would have thought dirty glassware could be so artistic? This guy!

Button, who lives in Phoenix, Ariz., has captured upward of 75 photographs of whisky residues that he considers good enough to share with the public.Some of his images will even be making their way over to Scotland in May for an exhibition at the Islay Festival of Music and Malt.And Button doesn’t plan on stopping anytime soon. “I’m trying to let the work just kind of grow organically and see where it takes me,” he says.He recently started experimenting with manipulating the whisky as it dries — moving the liquid around to create different deposit patterns.He has also begun to wonder about the science behind his images. “I find them fascinating in a weird kind of way,” he says. “I think it’s a perfect blend between science and creativity.”According to Howard Stone, head researcher at Princeton University’s Complex Fluids Group, the rings and waves seen in Button’s images are probably the result of particles that are left behind once the alcohol has evaporated.These particles, which give the liquor its flavor and color, are present in “very, very small quantities,” says Stone, and can create an “imprint of what the [whisky] was doing when it was trying to evaporate.”

via The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art : The Salt : NPR.