Posted in communication and networking, design and architecture, electronic imaging and displays

This Guy Is Knitting Every Frame Of A Movie Into A Watchable Scarf | Co.Design

This is a crazy amalgamation of art meets tech meets more art.

Using techniques like fair isle knitting and technology like the Jacquard loom, creating amazingly intricate images with weaving is nothing new, but a new project may be the first time those images have been animated.

Greg Climer, a fashion designer and faculty member at Parsons School of Design, has found a way to turn film into fabric and back again. He’s in the process of making a short film and intends to use a long knitted scarf at the film reel. A 19-second test shot, his proof of concept, shows that this wacky idea is possible.

more via This Guy Is Knitting Every Frame Of A Movie Into A Watchable Scarf | Co.Design | business + design.

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Posted in biology, electronic imaging and displays, Optics

Here’s the science behind that darn dress – ScienceAlert

…As much as I dislike stepping into the fray, it is rare that the combination of art and science makes such headlines, so, without further ado…

is the dress white and gold or black and blue

In case you missed it, this dress has been blowing up the Internet and tearing friendships apart since it was posted on Tumblr yesterday. Because even though the dress is so very clearly white and gold, some people out there are equally convinced it’s blue and black.

But we’re not going to get started on that debate. We’re here to tell everyone to chill, because there’s a scientific explanation behind this witchcraft. And, much to my horror, the dress is actually blue.

Read on to find out why.

via Here’s the science behind that darn dress – ScienceAlert.

Just for the record, my friend is able to switch back and forth between seeing it both as white and gold AND black and blue. I cannot. #thatdress

Posted in biology, chemistry, communication and networking, design and architecture, engineering, Illumination, physics

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

Some are gross, some are cool, some are geeky gifts for school!

Sorry, it’s Friday, I’m feeling a little Dr. Seussy. But I thought they were worth sharing.

These crafty creations would make the perfect gift for the science lover in your life…

[editor’s note/admission: these are also available for sale for the crafty science lover with no time on your hands, but I make no money from this, it’s just FYI.]

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

more via 10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com.

Posted in communication and networking, design and architecture

Michael Swaine’s Free “Mending Library” Repairs Clothes, Community | Ecouterre

What a great combination of art, technology, and giving back to your community:

On the 15th of every month, Michael Swaine trundles into San Francisco\’s Tenderloin district with a cart-mounted sewing machine—the old-fashioned kind, which you can only operate by means of a treadle. Setting up shop in a reclaimed alley known as the \”Tenderloin National Forest,\” as he has for the past 12 years, Swaine offers his services as a tailor, mending whatever clothing the neighborhood\’s residents bring him for free. A performance artist, an inventor, and a professor of ceramics at the California College of Arts, Swaine sees opportunities for change everywhere. His current ambition is the construction of a free \”mending library,\” a place for \”fixing the holes in our lives…to borrow thread and sewing machines and talk about life.”

more via Michael Swaine\’s Free \”Mending Library\” Repairs Clothes, Community | Ecouterre.

Posted in communication and networking, design and architecture, electronic imaging and displays, Illumination, Optics

LATEST: Microsoft presents wearable electronic dress – +Plastic Electronics

An image of the wearable texting frock

Talk about wearing your heart on your sleeve (hooray bad puns!):

A smart textile dress has been unveiled by Microsoft Research.

Made almost entirely from black and white rice paper, the Printing Dress comes equipped with a laptop, a projector and four circuit boards, with functional elements including buttons and the hem.

The wearer can type messages on a keyboard laced into the bodice, which are then projected on to the skirt, says the Microsoft News Centre.

The dress won Best Concept, and Best in Show, at the 15th annual International Symposium on Wearable Computers in June.

more via LATEST: Microsoft presents wearable electronic dress – +Plastic Electronics.

Posted in design and architecture, electronic imaging and displays, Illumination

Light Up Your Life With LEDs, Sewable Circuitry | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

I have just one word: pretty!

If you’ve always dreamed of colorful, glowing accoutrements, or just have some ideas for an upcoming Halloween costume, grab your soldering iron and a sewing needle: Here are a couple of products you can use to get a real 21st-century look.

Photos via  Jon Snyder/Wired.com. Check out more at Light Up Your Life With LEDs, Sewable Circuitry | Gadget Lab | Wired.com.

Posted in biology, design and architecture

Anatomy Dresses @Craftzine.com blog

The body is beautiful! Apparently the organs make especially good fashion statements; observe:

Rachel Wright of Mobile, AL creates some interesting repurposed clothing. (Her Etsy shop is called Toolgrrl Designs.) The dresses above are examples of designs she created for her series, The Dream Anatomy.

She writes about her series:

The Dream Anatomy series explore these imagined realms inside the body. Because these garments are meant to be worn, the boundary between the internal and the external is blurred. The invisible is made visible: wear your inside on the outside. By using women’s slips and nighties, articles that were not originally intended for public life, I am playiing with the line between the public and the private arenas.

more via Anatomy Dresses @Craftzine.com blog.