Posted in biology, chemistry, communication and networking, medical imaging

Antibotics: Using storytelling to get kids to take their medicine

IDEO has come up with a cool idea to get kids (and grown ups) actually interested and informed on taking antibiotics the right way.

The Antibotics are a robot gang with a plan to save the world from the deadly bacteria that kills thousands of people, and cost the taxpayers £1 billion, annually.

How will this intrepid team of roving robots come to the rescue? By using digital storytelling, pills and packaging to educate parents and kids about how to use antibiotics properly.

read the whole thing via Antibotics: Using storytelling to get kids to take their medicine.

A great way to get kids engaged with actually taking their medicine and feeling proactive, as well as educational for both kids and grown-ups.

 

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Posted in biology, electronic imaging and displays

Interactive Exhibition, Animations of Endangered Species using CSS

Designer Bryan James is trying to raise awareness and make people care about protecting animals and the environment, through interactive polygon art.

With more natural habitats being exploited for their resources on our planet, many species are in danger of extinction. To draw attention to this issue, designer Bryan James crafted a gorgeous interactive exhibition of 30 fascinating animals facing extinction, using morphing polygons.

In Pieces beautifully depicts rare creatures like the pygmy three-toed sloth, the Somali ostrich, the Brazilian armadillo and Kemp’s Ridley turtle with subtle animations as well as information on the threat to each species, visualized stats and links to preservation efforts to protect them.

more via This Interactive Exhibition of Endangered Species is Amazing.

Posted in communication and networking, engineering, music

Robots And Choreography Abound In Update To Ballet Masterpiece | The Creators Project

Romeo and Juliet and HAL…

Star-crossed lovers. Immaculate dance moves. Giant robots. If it sounds like the plot of the newest Guillermo del Toro movie, you wouldn’t be too far from the truth. The reality, however, might be even more exciting: Tarik Abdel-Gawad, director of the award-winning projection-mapping spectacular, Box, has finally released his pre-Box masterpiece, a robot-aided update of Tchaikovsky’s ballet fantasia, Francesca da Rimini, a piece as revered for its heartwrenching subject matter as for its incredibly precise choreography. With choreography from Yuri Possokhov, and starring San Francisco Ballet dancers Maria Kochetkova and Joan Boada, Abdel-Gawad took the piece one step further, employing a massive, robot-controlled camera to capture the deftness of the dance.Says Abdel-Gawad, “The film itself brings the viewer closer to a ballet performance than is possible on a stage. Using a robot allows the camera to be choreographed as well as the dancers, achieving spectacular shots designed specifically for this performance. The end result is a film that makes viewers feel they’re in the room dancing with the performers.”

more via [Exclusive] Robots And Choreography Abound In Update To Ballet Masterpiece | The Creators Project.

 

Posted in biology, chemistry, electronic imaging and displays

This Device Sniffs Out Pollution And Turns It Into Digital Art | The Creators Project

A good way of explaining pollution to people is to visualize it:

:vtol:, aka Dmitry Morozov, has previously turned tattoos into experimental instruments and highlighted the beauty of barcodes. Now, with Digioxide, the Russian artist is turning pollution recognition into tangible artwork. The portable device is equipped with sensors that measure air pollution gases and dust particles. It’s connected to a computer via bluetooth and turns information about the concentration of dust and harmful gases such as CO, CO2, HCHO, CH4 and C3H8 into generative graphics, forming an abstract image.

Digioxide has a mobile printer that allows the pollution data to be turned into physical prints of the digitized images—pixilated, colored graphics that offer a “snapshot” of the surrounding air. :vtol: explains that the tool allows users to “freely move around a city, seek out ecologically problematic places, and turn their data into digital artworks.”

more via This Device Sniffs Out Pollution And Turns It Into Digital Art | The Creators Project.

Posted in biology, chemistry, communication and networking, design and architecture, engineering, Illumination, physics

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

Some are gross, some are cool, some are geeky gifts for school!

Sorry, it’s Friday, I’m feeling a little Dr. Seussy. But I thought they were worth sharing.

These crafty creations would make the perfect gift for the science lover in your life…

[editor’s note/admission: these are also available for sale for the crafty science lover with no time on your hands, but I make no money from this, it’s just FYI.]

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

more via 10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com.

Posted in electronic imaging and displays

This Chameleon-Like Pen Can Match And Recreate Any Color You See In The World | The Creators Project

Technology once again helps out artists with an obsessive need to get that color juuuuust right.

Say there’s this particularly vibrant eggplant you see at the local market, and you want to use that exact lush purple tone to paint your walls with. Or imagine that you’re styling a photoshoot and you need to perfectly match a model’s nails with an electric-yellow convertible in the backgrouind. Trying to mimic colors by eye can only be so fool-proof and unfortunately we don’t have a built-in “Match” filter a la PhotoShop. Thankfully, a new pen is available for pre-ordering that acts as a real-life color copycat, allowing users to match any color they see in the world. The “Scribble” pen is a writing tool with a 16-bit RGB color sensor inside that can draw in over 16 million colors and “save” 100,000 unique colors in its body. The device even has a USB port, an opportunity for owners to upload IRL colors into URL programs and software. Graphic Designers can finally get that perfect shade of red to draw that Fuji apple on Illustrator.The chameleon-like pen is currently available to pre-order at a whopping $150, and is expected to hit the market next year. With a illustration tool like Scribbble, the 64-pack Crayola boxes just won’t cut it anymore.

See some photos of the device via This Chameleon-Like Pen Can Match And Recreate Any Color You See In The World | The Creators Project.

Posted in electronic imaging and displays, medical imaging

Surreal X-Ray Photographs Reveal Hidden Beauty in Nature | Inhabitat

Beautiful and insightful x-ray pictures of nature.

Our human eyes may be limited by visible light, but the work of physicist and artist Arie van ‘t Riet gives us a glimpse into the invisible universe around us. In exploration of nature’s hidden anatomy, Riet uses x-ray imagery on naturalistic compositions, or bioramas, created from flora and fauna. The challenging photography process requires Riet to experiment with different levels of x-ray energies to achieve the right amount of contrast in each image.

Riet uses x-ray imagery on naturalistic compositions, or bioramas, created from a combination of flora and fauna.
The production process begins with a black-and-white silver bromide x-ray image, which he then digitizes and inverts on his computer.
Riet experimented with similarly thin materials starting with a bouquet of tulips.