Posted in education, engineering, museum

Google Arts & Culture App turns art from all over the world into a meta museum

I love going to museums! I love seeing all kinds of amazing art and artifacts, learning more about an artist or piece of history, and making new discoveries.

Unfortunately, even in the museum-rich city where I live, it can be hard to see all the exhibits that come through, or even get to museums due to transportation or high cost (I’m not saying they’re wrong to charge those rates, I’m just saying if many kids had to pay $20 to look at art vs. $13 for a blockbuster film, I can guess which they’d choose).

Where I grew up the idea of a museum was a stuffy warehouse filled to the brim with items with minimal labeling and no context.

On either end of the spectrum, it can make art and history hard to engage with for many.

Now, Google has an app that is trying to address this divide.

Google has just unveiled a new app that makes it as easy to find the opening times of your local museum as it is to figure out who painted that bright purple Impressionist masterpiece you saw five years ago at the Louvre.

It’s called Google Arts & Culture, and it’s a tool for discovering art “from more than a thousand museums across 70 countries,” Google writes on its blog. More than just an online display of art, though, it encourages viewers to parse the works and gather insight into the visual culture we rarely encounter outside the rarified world of brick-and-mortar museums.

Most teens and young adults have smartphones.

This is a great way to bridge that gap between access points and give everyone the ability to geek out over Claude Monet or Alfred Stieglitz, or actually figure out who those two dudes are.

Well played Google.

h/t Fast Company Design.

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Posted in aerospace, engineering

Graffiti master KATSU shows street artists how the craft can reach new heights

Following the recent vandal attack on Kendell Jenner’s six-story Calvin Klein Jeans billboard, situated atop a building at the intersection of Lafayette and East Houston St, the perpetrator has unmasked himself as none other than KATSU, the prolific graffiti mastermind notorious for his deviant marriage of art and technology. What more, KATSU has decided to release his newest mischief maker, the very one used to deface the Jenner billboard, out into the public: you too can be a proud owner of the ICARUS ONE, the world’s first open-source paint drone!

more via News Platform is First Runner-Up in IBM Watson x PSFK Good Data Contest.

Posted in chemistry, design and architecture, engineering, food

A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal

If you saw this hanging out in a New York park last summer, now you know what it is:

It’s made from many, many plastic bottles stringed together. “53,780 used plastic bottles,” says designer Jason Klimoski, “the number thrown away in NYC in just 1 hour.” Klimoski and his team at STUDIO KCA collected the bottles – a combination of milk jugs and water bottles – and lashed them together to create “Head in the Clouds,” a pavilion people can walk into, sit inside, and contemplate just how much plastic is thrown away every day.

The structure, however, was temporary and the team is now looking for its next home. If you’re interested in having this in your back yard get in touch with the designers.

more via A Sculptural Cloud of Plastic Bottles Illustrates One Hour of Trash in NYC | Colossal.

Posted in communication and networking, engineering, music

Robots And Choreography Abound In Update To Ballet Masterpiece | The Creators Project

Romeo and Juliet and HAL…

Star-crossed lovers. Immaculate dance moves. Giant robots. If it sounds like the plot of the newest Guillermo del Toro movie, you wouldn’t be too far from the truth. The reality, however, might be even more exciting: Tarik Abdel-Gawad, director of the award-winning projection-mapping spectacular, Box, has finally released his pre-Box masterpiece, a robot-aided update of Tchaikovsky’s ballet fantasia, Francesca da Rimini, a piece as revered for its heartwrenching subject matter as for its incredibly precise choreography. With choreography from Yuri Possokhov, and starring San Francisco Ballet dancers Maria Kochetkova and Joan Boada, Abdel-Gawad took the piece one step further, employing a massive, robot-controlled camera to capture the deftness of the dance.Says Abdel-Gawad, “The film itself brings the viewer closer to a ballet performance than is possible on a stage. Using a robot allows the camera to be choreographed as well as the dancers, achieving spectacular shots designed specifically for this performance. The end result is a film that makes viewers feel they’re in the room dancing with the performers.”

more via [Exclusive] Robots And Choreography Abound In Update To Ballet Masterpiece | The Creators Project.

 

Posted in biology, chemistry, communication and networking, design and architecture, engineering, Illumination, physics

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

Some are gross, some are cool, some are geeky gifts for school!

Sorry, it’s Friday, I’m feeling a little Dr. Seussy. But I thought they were worth sharing.

These crafty creations would make the perfect gift for the science lover in your life…

[editor’s note/admission: these are also available for sale for the crafty science lover with no time on your hands, but I make no money from this, it’s just FYI.]

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com

more via 10 Geeky Gifts Inspired by Science | DiscoverMagazine.com.

Posted in communication and networking, engineering, music

Sound Looks Like This | Co.Design

Visualizing the waves that sound makes can be tricky but stunningly hypnotic:

For The Essence of Sound, that meant filming lycopodium powder as it shakes and dances in time to music by Sie’s friend and composer Clemens Haas. The music played out of a subwoofer placed nearby.

Sie uses lycopodium powder–an ultra-fine powder made from clubmoss spores–because its delicate texture creates the best expressions of sound oscillations. The finished product (made for German audio systems company Burkhardtsmaier) looks like a perfect storm of extreme weather: The powder bubbles up like molten lava, breaks apart like an earthquake, and finally gets blown upwards, in a micro-tornado, before settling back down.

You can see more of Sie’s work here.

Source via Sound Looks Like This | Co.Design | business + design.