Posted in biology, medical imaging

Innovative Brain Imaging Combines Sound And Light : NPR

I started this blog – I can’t remember how many years ago – when I was working for a scientific society focused on the study of light. Their members, such as this gentleman, were doing amazing things that made the very thin barriers between art and science bleed right into each other. Amazing breakthroughs that are only possible when we think creatively.

Lihong Wang creates the sort of medical technology you’d expect to find on the starship Enterprise.

Wang, a professor of biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has already helped develop instruments that can detect individual cancer cells in the bloodstream and oxygen consumption deep within the body. He has also created a camera that shoots at 100 billion frames a second, fast enough to freeze an object traveling at the speed of light.

Recently, Wang began experimenting with a technique that blends the speed and precision of light with the penetrating ability of sound. It’s called photoacoustic imaging.

“We’re combining the strengths of two forms of energy, light and sound, in a single form of imaging,” Wang says.

…light goes into the brain, and sounds come out. And just a few months ago, those sounds allowed a lab team to create high-speed, highly detailed, three-dimensional images of a mouse brain at work.

read more about it at Innovative Brain Imaging Combines Sound And Light : Shots – Health News : NPR.

Congratulations to Lihong Wang.

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Author:

Beth Kelley is a writer and researcher with an overall interest in how people engage with and are impacted by their environments and vice versa. This has manifested itself in many ways, by looking at creativity, playful spaces and environmental enrichment, sustainability, design research, and integrative and collaborative models of learning such as through play and hands-on learning.