Posted in chemistry, electronic imaging and displays, food

The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art : The Salt : NPR

Who would have thought dirty glassware could be so artistic? This guy!

Button, who lives in Phoenix, Ariz., has captured upward of 75 photographs of whisky residues that he considers good enough to share with the public.Some of his images will even be making their way over to Scotland in May for an exhibition at the Islay Festival of Music and Malt.And Button doesn’t plan on stopping anytime soon. “I’m trying to let the work just kind of grow organically and see where it takes me,” he says.He recently started experimenting with manipulating the whisky as it dries — moving the liquid around to create different deposit patterns.He has also begun to wonder about the science behind his images. “I find them fascinating in a weird kind of way,” he says. “I think it’s a perfect blend between science and creativity.”According to Howard Stone, head researcher at Princeton University’s Complex Fluids Group, the rings and waves seen in Button’s images are probably the result of particles that are left behind once the alcohol has evaporated.These particles, which give the liquor its flavor and color, are present in “very, very small quantities,” says Stone, and can create an “imprint of what the [whisky] was doing when it was trying to evaporate.”

via The Wonderful World Of Whisky Art : The Salt : NPR.

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Author:

Beth Kelley is a writer and researcher with an overall interest in how people engage with and are impacted by their environments and vice versa. This has manifested itself in many ways, by looking at creativity, playful spaces and environmental enrichment, sustainability, design research, and integrative and collaborative models of learning such as through play and hands-on learning.