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Shadows Bright As Glass: When Brain Injuries Transform Into Art : NPR

This morning I am listening to this interview on Fresh Air with Jon Sarkin, who became an artist after a serious brain injury. And I mean literally transformed, from a chiropractor to a compulsive doodler,

Jon Sarkin was working as a chiropractor when he suffered a massive stroke. Afterwards, the 35-year-old became a volatile visual artist with a ferocious need to create, as his brain tried to make sense of the world at large.

“[My artwork is] a manifestation of what happened to me,” Sarkin tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. “I’ve learned how to visually represent my existential dilemma caused by my stroke.”

Sarkin is the subject of Shadows Bright as Glass, a new book by science writer Amy Nutt. The book describes Sarkin’s journey from happy-go-lucky doctor to manically-compulsive artist.

more via Shadows Bright As Glass: When Brain Injuries Transform Into Art : NPR.

Sarkin describes it as “Everything is new, everything is alien…” The act of exploration and scientific inquiry is described similarly, but this guy is now forced to be in that frame of mind at all times. Really interesting stuff.

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Author:

Beth Kelley is a writer and researcher with an overall interest in how people engage with and are impacted by their environments and vice versa. This has manifested itself in many ways, by looking at creativity, playful spaces and environmental enrichment, sustainability, design research, and integrative and collaborative models of learning such as through play and hands-on learning.

3 thoughts on “Shadows Bright As Glass: When Brain Injuries Transform Into Art : NPR

  1. Jon Sarkin was working as a chiropractor when he suffered a massive stroke. Afterwards the 35-year-old became a volatile visual artist with a ferocious need to create as his brain tried to make sense of the world at large. My artwork is a manifestation of what happened to me Sarkin tells Fresh Airs Terry Gross.

  2. This is a fantastic book that uncovers the working of the brain in an inspirational way. For those interested in the study of the interaction and unique traits of the left brain and right brain, this is a book for you. I also recommend James Olson’s new book “The Whole Brain Path to Peace” (http://www.thewholebrainpath.com/ ) as another insightful look into the brain’s roles in our personality and inner workings.

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