Posted in chemistry, engineering, museum, Nanotechnology

Journal produces Microchip Art exhibit

Technology Review
Combinatorial Mixer. Credit: Lab on a Chip/ Chris Sip and Albert Folc

I have been vindicated! My life is complete! I am not the only one out there who thinks this! At least the journal editor of Lab on a Chip agrees with me, and that’s enough.

Albert Folch, associate professor in BioMEMs and Microfluidics at the University of Washington, entered the µTAS 2008 meeting’s open picture competition with an image from one of his papers. He didn’t win, but was captivated by the beauty of entries from fellow participants. He brought the idea back to Lab on a Chip, where he now serves as Art Editor. Folch announced the gallery’s opening on its Flikr Web site on June 24, 2010, and enthusiastically awaits contributions.

“Our fields of research are bursting with art,” Folch says in his introduction to the website. “I am willing to bet that your hard drive contains at least one gorgeous image that will make me catch my breath.”

Many of the images come from Folch’s own collection, and the gallery is a repository for happy accidents. “A lot of times we make mistakes in research that are prettier than the ones we end up publishing,” Folch says.

Art on a Chip
Glue in the Microchannels 2. Credit: Lab on a Chip/ Chris Sip and Albert Folc

Check out more photos at Technology Review.

Check out the Lab on a Chip group’s photopage: http://www.flickr.com/photos/labonachip/

Advertisements

Author:

Beth Kelley is an applied & digital anthropologist with an overall interest in how people engage with and are impacted by their environments and vice versa. This has manifested itself in many ways, by looking at creativity, playful spaces and environmental enrichment, sustainability, design research, and integrative and collaborative models of learning such as through play and hands-on learning.

One thought on “Journal produces Microchip Art exhibit

  1. Dig it. The Adobe Creative Suite allows me to make beautiful artwork on my computer. But it’s cool to see that the computer itself is a scientifc work of art.

Comments are closed.