Posted in biology, design and architecture, engineering

New farmhouse design using old methods

From BBC News:

The farmhouse has been designed to blend in with its surroundings in the south of Scotland as much as possible
The farmhouse has been designed to blend in with its surroundings in the south of Scotland as much as possible

It is highly unusual for anyone to welcome being “fleeced” during the building of their new home.

Yet that is one key part of a green farmhouse scheme which has recently been approved in southern Scotland.

Among the elements which will make the Cairn Valley farmhouse near Moniaive “carbon neutral” is using the nearby sheep to help keep the humans warm.

Their wool will be used to provide insulation in a scheme which is proud of its eco-credentials.

Dumfriesshire farmer Neil Gourlay, 49, said the project had been a “lifelong dream”.

He said he was keen to do “something different” that would also be environmentally friendly.

One element he was particularly keen on was to use sheep’s wool as insulation rather than selling it for what he described as a “pittance”.

He admitted: “I’m a miserable Scotsman in some respects.

“We could do a lot more with reclaimed materials that are just as good as brand new.”

That means that wool sheared from his sheep will be used as insulation – a practice he hopes might catch on with other farmers.

That is not where the use of elements from the Dumfries and Galloway landscape ends.

Locally reclaimed timber is intended to form part of the farmhouse design.

Existing external dry stone walls will be extended to come into the building.

While the sloped roof to the main living area will be covered in turf and also feature a variety of low-growing plants.

Read on…

Advertisements

Author:

Beth Kelley is an applied & digital anthropologist with an overall interest in how people engage with and are impacted by their environments and vice versa. This has manifested itself in many ways, by looking at creativity, playful spaces and environmental enrichment, sustainability, design research, and integrative and collaborative models of learning such as through play and hands-on learning.