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Innovative Brain Imaging Combines Sound And Light : NPR

July 27, 2015

I started this blog – I can’t remember how many years ago – when I was working for a scientific society focused on the study of light. Their members, such as this gentleman, were doing amazing things that made the very thin barriers between art and science bleed right into each other. Amazing breakthroughs that are only possible when we think creatively.

Lihong Wang creates the sort of medical technology you’d expect to find on the starship Enterprise.

Wang, a professor of biomedical engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has already helped develop instruments that can detect individual cancer cells in the bloodstream and oxygen consumption deep within the body. He has also created a camera that shoots at 100 billion frames a second, fast enough to freeze an object traveling at the speed of light.

Recently, Wang began experimenting with a technique that blends the speed and precision of light with the penetrating ability of sound. It’s called photoacoustic imaging.

“We’re combining the strengths of two forms of energy, light and sound, in a single form of imaging,” Wang says.

…light goes into the brain, and sounds come out. And just a few months ago, those sounds allowed a lab team to create high-speed, highly detailed, three-dimensional images of a mouse brain at work.

read more about it at Innovative Brain Imaging Combines Sound And Light : Shots – Health News : NPR.

Congratulations to Lihong Wang.

Painting with Light

July 27, 2015

Originally posted on The Dirt:

lok1 From the series Decoding Scape (cropped) / Lee Jeong Lok

Contemporary artists around the world are painting with light, using photographic techniques to add layers of light art on top of real-world scenes. These layers, which take many forms, add depth, evoke awe, and are stunningly creative. These images also illustrate the changing relationship between real and digital realms, nature and technology, and the photographer and their studio tools.

Korean artist Lee Jeong Lok overlays glowing Korean characters, symbols, and stylized natural forms like butterflies and trees on the natural vistas he has photographed.

lok2 From the series Nabi (cropped) / Lee Jeong Lok

In Designboom, he writes: “I have been painting something that exists despite its invisible nature; places that correspond to the visible world, places beyond our sensual cognition, profoundly mysterious places that nevertheless cannot be separated from our world of cognition.”

lok3 From the series Nabi (cropped) /…

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Graffiti master KATSU shows street artists how the craft can reach new heights

July 11, 2015

Following the recent vandal attack on Kendell Jenner’s six-story Calvin Klein Jeans billboard, situated atop a building at the intersection of Lafayette and East Houston St, the perpetrator has unmasked himself as none other than KATSU, the prolific graffiti mastermind notorious for his deviant marriage of art and technology. What more, KATSU has decided to release his newest mischief maker, the very one used to deface the Jenner billboard, out into the public: you too can be a proud owner of the ICARUS ONE, the world’s first open-source paint drone!

more via News Platform is First Runner-Up in IBM Watson x PSFK Good Data Contest.

Antibotics: Using storytelling to get kids to take their medicine

June 17, 2015

IDEO has come up with a cool idea to get kids (and grown ups) actually interested and informed on taking antibiotics the right way.

The Antibotics are a robot gang with a plan to save the world from the deadly bacteria that kills thousands of people, and cost the taxpayers £1 billion, annually.

How will this intrepid team of roving robots come to the rescue? By using digital storytelling, pills and packaging to educate parents and kids about how to use antibiotics properly.

read the whole thing via Antibotics: Using storytelling to get kids to take their medicine.

A great way to get kids engaged with actually taking their medicine and feeling proactive, as well as educational for both kids and grown-ups.


This Guy Is Knitting Every Frame Of A Movie Into A Watchable Scarf | Co.Design

June 11, 2015

This is a crazy amalgamation of art meets tech meets more art.

Using techniques like fair isle knitting and technology like the Jacquard loom, creating amazingly intricate images with weaving is nothing new, but a new project may be the first time those images have been animated.

Greg Climer, a fashion designer and faculty member at Parsons School of Design, has found a way to turn film into fabric and back again. He’s in the process of making a short film and intends to use a long knitted scarf at the film reel. A 19-second test shot, his proof of concept, shows that this wacky idea is possible.

more via This Guy Is Knitting Every Frame Of A Movie Into A Watchable Scarf | Co.Design | business + design.

How Playing With Puppets Turns New Learners into Future CEOs | GOOD

June 10, 2015


I loved how the original article author pulled in studies looking at the neuroscientific benefits of building and manipulating a puppet.

Originally posted on Mental Flowers:

This is a very well thought out and researched article about the benefits of pretend play, specifically creating and playing with puppets.

How Playing With Puppets Turns New Learners into Future CEOs | GOOD

The [Puppet School] curriculum establishes the tenets of puppeteering education, which put educational theories about the importance of play and grit and resilience into practice.

In the beginning classes, students start to learn basic head and mouth movements, using motor skills in both hands and both arms, choreographed to pre-existing sound tracks of well-known pop songs. Students learn to articulate vowels and develop a sense of rhythm with their bodies. As the exercises advance, students learn to improvise using their own voices and hand movements, and eventually choreograph movement to material they’ve written. From motor skills, to communication and improv skills, then finally written skills, students exercise many parts of their brains at Puppet School, increasing communication between their two brain hemispheres.

According to Eric Jensen’s Teaching with…

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The Microbes on the Handprint of an 8-Year-Old After Playing Outside | Colossal

June 8, 2015

This is really quite a stunningly beautiful study of the human hand in a unique and mirrored way.

We all know our bodies are home to countless millions of bacteria and microorganisms, but without seeing them with our bare eyes it’s almost impossible to comprehend. This petri dish handprint created by Tasha Sturm of Cabrillo College, vividly illustrates the variety of bacteria found on her 8-year-old son’s hand after playing outdoors. The print itself represents several days of growth as different yeasts, fungi, and bacteria are allowed to incubate.

It’s safe to say almost everything you see growing in this specimen is harmless and in many cases even beneficial to a person’s immunity, but it just goes to show why we sometimes it’s good to wash our hands. Sturm discusses in detail how she made the print in the comments of this page.

via The Microbes on the Handprint of an 8-Year-Old After Playing Outside | Colossal.


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